Book review: Serotonin by Michel Houellebecq

Since “Atomised”, Michel Houellebecq has fit in at mainstream literature as a kind of prophet of contemporary affairs. “Prescient”, “The voice of the discontent”, “alarming” are some adjectives employed to describe the French author. Recently, he would have foreseen the French yellow-vest movement. He was so important to the extent of living under armed protection during the terrorist…

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Reassessing the life of Chica da Silva: A tale about Brazil

There is no doubt that Brazil’s history remains under-researched and under-theorised. Especially with regards to the country’s extensive colonial legacy, different periods can be open to negotiation and interpretation, but most of which are still stuck in a range of stereotypes that say little about the complexities of its characters. The biography of the 18th-century…

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What impressed me recently (1): Arendt, Fox, Lithuania, and Chagall

Hannah Arendt’s Lying in Politics (1971) Arendt’s style is not for beginners. She throws at you lots of background information, random quotes in Latin, archaic terms, tricky references. However, once we join her, at least when we think we do, it is hard not to transform her reason into a shared passion. The Watergate scandal and…

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